Sunday, November 3, 2013

THE WOOD GATHERERS

 Tracey Deep is a floral sculptor inspired by nature. See more here

There is nothing quite like 
the feeling of calm that envelopes one 
when out gathering 
I love returning from a walk
laden with bouquets of drift wood
I'm drawn to driftwood colours
soft greys, warm woodiness, sun bleached naturals.
Wood, tossed about in the sea
the edges rubbed smooth by sand and water.

 North Carolina artist Patrick Dougherty create's freeform sculptures woven together out of branches. See website here.

As a boy, Patrick Dougherty gathered twigs. He began "drawing" with sticks and later he used saplings and tree cuttings found along hydro lines to create his magnificent sculptures.


Patrick Dougherty gathering branches. Website here.

"It seems like humans have to continuously struggle with ideas about nature and redefining our relationship with the natural world. Domesticated gardens versus the wilderness are part of a worldwide discussion and part of my (our) inner conflict. Certainly gardens are a kind of rendition of the unfettered wilds. Shrubs, trees, flowers and grass become commodities and are forced into human geometry. I try to free the surfaces of my work using sticks as a drawing material, work them in such a way they look like they are escaping those chains of being planted in a row. I imagine that the wilderness lurks inside my forms and that it is an irrepressible urge."  -  Patrick Dougherty

I enjoyed John Grande's interview with Patrick.


Large scale temporary sculptures from materials gathered in the nearby landscape by Patrick Dougherty

"It seems that people like gardens and grass, but they desperately desire a connection to wilderness" - Patrick Dougherty


"Tree Fall" by Andy Goldsworthy. The ceiling and suspended tree branch have been covered in clay. Goldsworthy has succeeded in creating a "Hobbit hole". Read about this new installation here. 

Andy Goldsworthy with his installation, Tree Fall

"I enjoy the freedom of just using my hands and "found" tools -- a sharp stone, the quill of a feather, thorns. I take the opportunities each day offers: if it is snowing, I work with snow, at leaf-fall it will be with leaves; a blown-over tree becomes a source of twigs and branches. I stop at a place or pick up a material because I feel that there is something to be discovered. Here is where I can learn."  -  Andy Goldsworthy


Islamic/Meso America by Loren Eiferman. Website here

"The wood, for me, is now a line in space created by hundreds of smaller pieces of wood jointed together to create one sculpture. To create my work, I usually begin with a drawing, an intention of what direction I want my sculpture to go in. I start out each day with a walk in the woods and gather sticks that have fallen to the ground."  -  Loren Eiferman

 Black Hole by Loren Eiferman. Website here.


Loren Eiferman. Website here

Roger Ackling "draws" on found wood with a ray of sunlight through a magnifying glass. 
I know! Amazing!
Found wood assemblage by Roger Ackling. See more here.

Assemblage by Roger Ackling

Flying machine by Wim Del Arte. Blog here.

Wim Del Arte spends many a day out walking along the banks of La Palma, gathering drift wood and found objects. He then creates the most amazing array of art with his lucky finds. The flying machine is assembled from driftwood, aluminium, copper, rusted metal, bits of twisted plastic and spark plugs found on the beach of Tazacourt.

"Collectors are happy people"  -  Goethe

72 comments:

  1. bois et branches sont un matériel pour l'art et la création formidable!
    merci!

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  2. How interesting this is Robyn - it really gave me food for thought. Anmdy Goldsworthy is of course very familiar to me - there is a lot of his work around here. But the ideas of Patrick Dougherty's work - that unfettered nature of his drawing is fascinating and I envy it greatly. I have this urge for everything to be neat and tidy - I only wish I could have that freedom.

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    1. It must be wonderful to experience Goldworthy's and Dougherty's work in person.

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  3. Have I ever thanked you for your wonderfully informative posts? For introducing us to artists, that I at least was not aware of? For the thought and time that goes into these posts? If not, then know that I am very grateful to have connected with you. Your own work speaks to me so strongly that even as I desire to see more of it, the desire to be introduced to the amazing artists that you discover if just as strong.

    Thank you Robyn for all that you do. Enjoy!

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    1. Jennifer, thank you so much. You have made my day.

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  4. Coming home from the beach, or the woods, or a mountain with a stone or twig or leaf in our pocket seems to be impossible for most of us to resist! Thanks for another great set of links to interesting artists.

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    1. Often when I put my hand into a pocket of a jacket I haven't worn in a while I'm surprised by something I've picked up off the beach

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  5. R- beautiful post that appeals so much to a gatherer. Though I don't do twigs and branches I love the textured pieces artists create with them - weaving, constructing stacking - turning bits and pieces into shapes and meaning. Thanks. Go well. B

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    1. Thanks Barry. A walk is just that much more interesting when you can gather along the way.

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  6. Oh me oh my - so many beautiful images here that sing to me. Roger Ackling's drawings are a revelation to me. Thanks again for such a lovely wander...

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    1. Fiona I've been intrigued by Roger Ackling's work for a while but I have only just discovered how he burns the lines onto the wood. Extraordinary!

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  7. I enjoyed this SO much! Thank you for sharing all these wonderful nature artists - a whole new group of artists to explore and enjoy - and inspire!! thank you.

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    1. Starr, I know how much you love your forest so I'm not surprised you enjoyed the post.

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  8. Robyn - I love this post and these artists who work with natural materials - bringing more awareness to the importance and impermanence of nature. I've seen Patrick Doughtery's work in front of the Bascom (Highlands, NC).
    And I love the 'flying machine.'
    You always find the best artists to showcase. Thanks you!

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    1. Now I'm envious! It must be amazing to see Patrick Dougherty's work up close.

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  9. So that is Andy Goldsworthy. I've been a fan of his work forever, now I have a face to the name. His work that you've chosen to show is amazing, as are the works of all the other artists.

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    1. This image surprised me as he looks so different without his beard.

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  10. Always new discoveries when I come to your place; people using different materials in interesting and surprising ways. My faith in humanity is always restored by the creative imagination.

    Nature is such a wonderful artist. When I'm on the beach or in the woods, I often look around at the moss and rocks and wonder, how could we do any better art than this? But then here it is people collaborating and riffing off what the natural world sets out.

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    1. Indeed, the imagination of creative people never ceases to amaze me.

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  11. I love Patrick Dougherty I just found his book recently what a gift! I had not seen the Goldsworthy tree fall before, so mosaic like, yum! Thank you for always sharing so much.

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    1. I was so pleased to find a recent installation by Goldsworthy. (This one started mid October).

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  12. I missed a Patrick Dougherty installation that was only a few miles from here when I first moved here! Darn, I bet they are amazing to be inside. And that new Goldsworthy installation is quite something. I love his mud walls, and this takes it to another level entirely. The other artists are new to me, I'm off to wander on their sites, thanks!

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    1. Just when I thought he couldn't top his previous sculptures Goldsworthy comes up with something completely different.

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  13. the little village with sticks and the fall colors is mesmerizing, just wonderful what an artists can create with found items.

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    1. A sculpture that changes with the seasons. I've seen other images with a green backdrop.

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  14. You are probably very used to visitors popping in, Robyn, to say, "Hi, thanks for the great post ... I'm off now to go check all your wonderful links!" ... and so it goes with me this time, too ;>]] Tah.

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  15. You began with my two favourite artists- Andy and Patrick. His work looks like the wind whirled the saplings into place- with such beautiful line. I had his dvd - and now the other magicians.... such an inspiring collection.

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  16. oh, that flying machine!

    I love wood that has journeyed and found a new home at the beach.

    THank you for your blog that delights, informs and inspires.

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    1. There is just something about those smooth, sun bleached, sea tumbled pieces of wood!

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  17. why have i never thought of drawing on wood with a magnifying glass?
    ??
    ?
    sigh.

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    1. .... because you have so many other wondrous things on your mind, India!

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  18. I love your original blogs! Thanks!
    Greetings, Zem.

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  19. inspiring special art post
    thanks for sharing these ideas

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  20. You find the most amazing things to showcase. I love Andy Goldworthy and the whole concept of using nature as art. Great post.

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    1. It's a wonderful concept isn't it?! And digital photography makes it even more amazing especially for those pieces that disintegrate quickly.

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  21. Robyn, All so wonderful. I love Goldsworthy and Roger Ackling is amazing!!!!! Thank you for this. xoxo

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    1. ....and to think Roger Ackling does most of his work while out searching and gathering.

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  22. ahh
    wood whispering
    AND some of my favorite artists!
    thanks as always Robyn

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  23. I am one of "those" people that gather natural items while out and about. Can't help myself. They call to me. I have yet to assemble anything as complex and beautiful as any of this but boy do these pictures give one inspiration.

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    1. Who can resist picking up a shell off the beach?!

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  24. magnifying glass? oh my, amazing post!!

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  25. BEautiful images as always dear Robyn!

    Please consider yourself officially invited to participate this year's 5th Annual Gratitude (word) Quilt. Instructions (it is very simple) and a link that explains the origin of the word quilt can be found at the top of my blog. In past years there have been participants from every continent except Antarctica.It wouldn't be the same without you:-)

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  26. Love Tracey Deep's work !
    have you seen the video of Tracey's talk from the Monet & Impressionsists show at the Art Gallery of NSW in 2008?
    http://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/channel/clip/147/

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  27. Beautiful collection of wood works! I currently have a near-fetish for anything made of raw wood, so really enjoyed this post, thank you!

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  28. I have a beach below my home on the cliff and I am now feeling sad about all the driftwood and branches and twigs laying down there waiting.... I do love driftwood and branches but do not trek down there as much as I should... I guess it is all too close ha ha. I am blown away by the size and scale of Patrick Doughety's sculptures... when you seen them next to trees.. wow. A beautiful post!

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    1. After seeing the art created by these amazing artists, a walk on the beach takes on a new glow. Time to trek down to your beach again Donna!

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  29. What an amazing and inspiring information in this post. I'm glad I haven't missed it! I like Tracey's installations a lot, but what impressed me most were Patrick Dougherty's reflectionst! I haven't thought about nature from this angle: that planting "in rows", following our imagination, "kills" in a way nature's free will... There's nothing wrong with it though, for me, in man's desire to express his sense for beauty.
    But maybe we don't notice how beautiful wilderness can be, too...

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    1. Patrick's reflections gave me food for thought too. I tend to let my garden go wild and it's only the thought of what people must think that I will clip it into shape again.

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  30. Incredible work. And great to see shots of some of the artists. Extra thanks for that!

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    1. It's always interesting to see the artist behind the art. It was a surprise seeing Goldsworthy without his beard for a change. It just feels wrong :-)

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  31. Andy Goldsworthy!!! One of my favs (after you, of course).

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  32. Dear Robyn, This post of gathering and weaving and story telling has really inspired me this morning. Thank you.
    roxanne

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  33. A beautiful and inspiring post Robyn. Visually deligthful and soothing for the senses. Transports me back to my beachcombing days, of wondering aimlessly along the beach living within the bounds of nothingness... aaah, sweet bliss

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    1. Sweet bliss indeed! I'm feeling the tug to go gathering again.

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  34. It's so satisfying to me that REAL artists use these materials to make art. As a child, I used to think how beautiful they were, and made things out of sticks, grass, etc. When I grew up I learned those weren't 'real' art materials, but still wanted to use them to create, but felt embarrassed picking up sticks and stones... I love to see the gorgeous things these artists have made with them!

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  35. You continue to teach me. Thank you.

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  36. REALLY Great textures...Inspiring, too!

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  37. The quote from Andy Goldsworthy says it all, really… this is how we must live our lives… make the most of what is given, what is found, what we have… a beautiful philosophy for all of us… LIFE is ART.

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