Friday, October 23, 2009

WEATHERED WALLS


Travel Stomach, mixed media , by Clay Ketter.


If only walls could talk ...... Well, some of them do, especially when artists capture the essence of these beautiful old walls, transforming something so mundane into works of art.


Photograph by Clay Ketter


Photograph by Clay Ketter


Gretchen Papka was captivated by the weathered walls she discovered during her travels in Italy.


Select Metal No.III. Mixed media, photo, encaustics, oils on panel. Gretchen Papka

"My work is inspired by bold architecture, textured walls, utilitarian objects and beauty. Each of these is revealed and celebrated in layers of beeswax, resin and color while subtle details are mysteriously hidden. " - Gretchen Papka




Select Metal No 6. Mixed media - photo, encaustics, oils on panel. Gretchen Papka



Wallwork - No I. Encaustic, paper, oil pigments with found materials on wood panel. Gretchen Papka.



Laurie Ann Pearsall "collects images, objects and stories that relate to change over time, more specifically, that relate to how people create a home, both metaphorically and figuratively speaking. My work depicts an intuitive interaction between these collections and my state of mind and spirit at a given moment.I begin with a gathering of concrete visual references: photographs of crumbling or dismantled homes, rusted remnants of cast-off objects from construction sites; flattened boxes and containers. These things are the imprint of a vacated dwelling, the debris of daily living. Like pieces of evidence whispering, “ I was here”, I use these images and materials as my foundation to create responses to my own search for home."



Reforms III. Mixed Media by Laurie Ann Pearsall

The piece above needs to be seen enlarged to appreciate it. Go to Lauries website here

Photograph by Margaret Ryall

Margaret Ryall has been photographing the layers of history in torn wallpaper since 2006. Her Remnants series formed a solo show last May and can be seen here.
"I think the best thing about my wallpaper photos is the natural layers that are created by tearing back to the final layer of board. It is so much like looking back through time."
Photo by Miquel Bohigas Costabella
On Flickr I found the most wonderful photographs of walls with a history. Those by Miquel Bohigas Costabella are stunning.

Scarred, scratched, spattered, speckled and stained. Peeling, flaking, gouged, crumbling and collapsing.
Miquel Bohigas Costabella



Miquel Bohigas Costabella


There are 16,000 Flickr Groups with walls in the title. Scrawls on Walls, Talking to a Brick Wall, Peeled and Patched Walls, Paper Wall, Up against a Wall, Dirty Walls, Mirror Mirror on the Wall, Plants on Walls. A feast for the eyes of the wall obsessed. It's worth visiting Pixmaniaque's Flickr sets, here,

59 comments:

  1. a huge fan of the 'decaying wall', these examples are fabulous and the artist Gretchen Papka is just amazing! thanks again Robyn xxo

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  2. Everyone of these photographs is inspiration for a piece of textile art Robyn - thank you for the ideas.

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  3. wow! (that's all, just 'wow!' : )

    xo

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  4. You've done it again, Robyn. Everytime I visit my brain makes more neural connections!

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  5. Your blog has been amazing lately. I'm really enjoying the exquisite images. Thanks!

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  6. these are just gorgeous. of course I am partial to crumbling splendor, but these are just divine images! thanks for this!

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  7. Wonderful stuff. I like the look of things in layers, not bothering to remove all of yesterday's paint or plaster, but just overlaying with something else. The decaying results are much more beautiful and a sort of patina of time you'll find nowhere else.

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  8. Spent some wonderful time here loving these walls...visited Laurie's blog too! Can't be said better...WOW!

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  9. I am particularly drawn to weathered walls and decay as well. These are incredible photos.

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  10. These are gorgeous. I see so many human features in the first piece. Is that weird?

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  11. your work is stunning!!!!
    Bello bello!!!
    love and light
    solange

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  12. that second one is like a boro textile...

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  13. Glad you're all enjoying the weathered walls!

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  14. Thanks for introducing us to these great artists, Robyn. As to the weathered walls, my partner, Simon is a photographer and whenever we go anywhere, he spends half his time with his camera pressed up against a crumbling wall or piece of wood! I just stand like a twit, smiling at bemused passers by! However, they do look beautiful, as your post shows.

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  15. You've done it again...another wonderful, inspiring post. I love buildings and architecture so these images really appeal.
    About to check out the links now!

    Jacky xox

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  16. Hi Robyn
    I found you on Debrina's blog and happy to see someone who can see art in weathered walls. I think I know of some here and there, I feel the need to hunt them down now. Thanks for the inspiration!

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  17. Thanks fro including me, Robyn - I suddenly feel not so alone! I have been obsessed with such imagery inspired literally by the photography I do here in Mallorca, but metaphorically by having had to move sooo many times. I am excited to see others who have a similar sensibility. I am hanging an exhibiton this week- so check out my sites for even more new work in this vein. Laurie

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  18. Your blog has such beautiful interesting this, a feast for the eyes! Hope you have a lovely Sunday

    Carolyn ♥

    ps. having a little giveaway if you want to pop over

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  19. your blog is like therapy for me. love where you take us!

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  20. I really love this pictures!!!

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  21. "Weathered Walls" is such a beautiful collection of textures and mystery... thank you for all the links... once again you fill me with ideas... Roxanne

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  22. Just popped over from Blu's blog. VERY interesting blog you have here will visit again :-) TF

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  23. you are in my head again...

    love this post.
    am coming across a lot of authentic crumbling living buildings twined with nature here. they need documenting.

    going to check links

    thanda

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  24. Thanks for including my work in your post Robyn. I couldn't wait to get to a computer once I returned from my trip tonight.

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  25. fantastic images. love the way you have composed these images of subjects most people wouldn't look twice at!

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  26. I live in a city with lots of empty old houses and factories. And I always thought, how beautiful this decay is....As somebody who should guide tourists through our city I would seriously offer photo-tours through these old streets factories...the walls-they're paintings!
    What a beautiful post and reminder!

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  27. A feast for the eyes, thank you Robyn!

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  28. Great comments! It was only recently that I discovered that there were so many people who appreciate the beauty of decaying walls as much as I do. (Actually I don't think I've met anyone here in my neck of the woods who enthuses over aging walls but people on Flickr and in the blog world certainly make up for it)

    Jo Archer, when I walk around photographing every rusty pipe or peeling door my daughter cringes. At least you smile like a twit :-)

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  29. How am I going to tear myself away from these shots?
    I particularly love where those steps once were, but every shot is a great one. Thanks for another great show.

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  30. i imagine placing my hand against a sun warmed segment of each of these walls - just to feel them and the history they contain would feel like being a part of something. beautiful robyn...

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  31. Love the textures and earthy colors. And yes, love the aging walls - especially close up. Thank you for inspiring me yet again!

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  32. I like the circular tunneling effect of Laurie Ann Pearsall..

    another earthy collection of the urban...

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  33. Ah Robyn, I come hear to listen to you speak the language; to sit at your feet and learn of your vision and to enjoy the stories of the tribe. Blessings and gratitude to you.

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  34. Man...these are incredible. I got so excited looking at all this and it just got me thinking in a whole new way. That is what I LOVE about blogs...so much to see, so many new ideas, so much inspiration. Thank you so much for sharing. I will be back poring over all this stuff for hours.

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  35. ah - walls and their stories. Like the drawings on cave walls. all connected, aren't we? thank you for sharing the wonderful art you discover!

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  36. I am intriqued by old wall, old wall paper, old graffiti, old paint...old lines from old lives...your not alone!

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  37. It is just after 4 am still jet lagged, loving your blog,wanting to get on with some creating but still organising stuff, all the photos for one thing!
    Those walls are so satisfying, but also I am so glad that you had such a good time at the beach.
    Getting very hot here suddenly wondering how I and the garden will cope!

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  38. So textured and interesting with all the layers and depth! Wish I could use these walls as a backdrop for my Brass Tacks photo shoots.

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  39. Such beauty in the most unlikely places!!

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  40. Robyn, These are so wonderful! there is so much emotion and beauty to be found in the most common places...just love the power and artistic quality of disintegration and layers. Thanks for always inspiring with your finds!

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  41. Wonderfully inspiring post Robyn. I love the decay and detritus we get through the passage of time on architecture. I haven't time now to follow the links but I will be back for more. This is from someone who loves photographing rusty barbed wire fences.

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  42. Robyn,
    Wonderful post and I love all of these. Sorry it has been awhile since I have made a visit.. I will try to visit more often.
    Take care,
    Katelen

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  43. I feel vindicated! I thought I was one of very few weird ones who take pictures of crumbling bricks and aging plaster but apparently not - there are zillions of us if those flickr groups are anything to go by. Yay! I will now just smile to myself quietly when I'm snapping away and receiving some odd looks from passers-by because I know I'm in the company of many kindred spirits ;) Some really beautiful examples here Robyn, thank you!

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  44. I once had an art professor in college who said, "being a great artist is really about learning how to SEE." I couldn't agree more. I think your post proves this.

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  45. Hey Robyn!!

    These wall are simply beautiful. Rustic, Inspiring, and Creative. I wish my walls in my room were that cool!

    I've missed you!

    Love,
    Queeny

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  46. Good morning, Robyn... I'm always so happy when I see that you've visited my site. Unfortunately, my blog writing has taken a hit the past few months... hopefully to be corrected soon. I have your blog in Yahoo window and love seeing a new message pop up... its all so textural, warm, human, connected. I love decaying walls. I love the history, but I mostly love the randomness of it. Have you ever done a post on tree bark? Probably so. Just stopping in for a moment - thanks for sharing so much with so many....

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  47. So many stories live in those walls..

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  48. Gives a whole new meaning to the phrase 'wall art' doesn't it? The textures and colors are intriguing. They really make me want to take a closer look. Once again Robyn, you find the best stuff.

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  49. Robyn, you've gathered an 'exhibit' so rich in textures, I know I'll be back to look at this post over and over. Pearsall's statement on how we make a home is intriguing.

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  50. So much inspiration Robyn and so many wonderful links, thanks for sharing them with us. There just aren't enough hours in a day.

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  51. Love wall of course- no surprise.
    Already familiar with Clay Ketter but will definitely check out the other wonderful artists here.
    p.s. took some wall pictures in Kyoto which I loved!

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  52. What a beautiful post indeed, with wonderful imagery. I liked going through again :)

    Dagdusheth Ganpati

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  53. i really appreciate the flurry of comments you left yesterday, i was surprised, nicely so. thank you!
    i have to say i've had a firefox tab open to this post nonstop. i may be doing a wall of a junkyard building in the next few months, something i've NEVER EVER DONE and find this inspiring even if i have no clue where to start or HOW. which i think is why i land here everyday and pop in.
    you have a wonderful blog!

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  54. Thanks for select some of my photos in your blog

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